The International Plant Sentinel Network: an update on phase 2

  • Kate Marfleet Botanic Gardens Conservation International
  • Suzanne Sharrock Botanic Gardens Conservation International

Abstract

Invasive plant pests and pathogens pose a considerable threat to plant health worldwide. With increasing globalisation of trade in plants and plant material, and the effects of climate change, this threat is predicted to continue to rise. In recent years, there has been a sharp increase in the number of these harmful invasive organisms which cause large-scale environmental and economic damage. A significant issue in managing this threat is predicting which organisms will pose a threat in the future. Sentinel plants are individuals found outside their native ranges that can be surveyed for damage by organisms they would not otherwise encounter. Monitoring plant sentinels can build knowledge and understanding of pest/host relationships to support the development of management plans and risk assessments. Botanic gardens and arboreta, whose collections are estimated to include 30–40 per cent of all known plant species, many of which are exotic, are unique and under-utilised resources that can support sentinel research. The International Plant Sentinel Network (IPSN) consists of botanic gardens and arboreta, National Plant Protection Organisations (NPPOs) and plant health scientists who collaborate to provide an early-warning system for new and emerging plant pests and pathogens. Members provide scientific evidence to NPPOs to inform plant health activities and thus help safeguard susceptible plant species. In the UK, the IPSN conducts research activities prioritised by a Research and Development committee and preliminary findings of recent research activities are outlined in this paper. The IPSN also focuses on increasing knowledge and awareness, seeking best practice, developing standardised
approaches and providing training materials and methodologies for monitoring and surveying to enable gardens to contribute to sentinel research. Through multi-disciplinary collaboration and information sharing the IPSN aims to reduce the risk that alien invasive pests and pathogens pose to global plant health.

Author Biographies

Kate Marfleet, Botanic Gardens Conservation International

Kate Marfleet is Seed Conservation and Plant Health Network Coordinator

Suzanne Sharrock, Botanic Gardens Conservation International

Head of Global Programmes

References

ANAGNOSTAKIS, S.L. (1987). Chestnut blight:
the classical problem of an introduced pathogen.
Mycologica, 79: 23–37. doi:10.2307/3807741 .
BABU, B., WASHBURN, B.K., ERTEK, T.S., MILLER,
S.H., RIDDLE, C.B., KNOX, G.W., OCHOA-CORONA,
F.M., OLSON, J., KATIRCIOĞLU, Y.Z. & PARET,
M.L. (2017). A field based detection method for
Rose rosette virus using isothermal probe-based
Reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase
amplification assay. Journal of Virological Methods,
247: 81–90. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.
jviromet.2017.05.019.
BARHAM, E., SHARROCK, S., LANE, C. & BAKER,
R. (2015). An International Plant Sentinel Network.
Sibbaldia, 13: 83–98.
BROOME, A., RAY, D., MITCHELL, R. &
HARMER, R. (2018). Responding to ash dieback
(Hymenoscyphus fraxineus) in the UK: woodland
composition and replacement tree species.
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research,
92(1): 108–119. doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/
forestry/cpy040.
CIPOLLINI, D. (2015). White fringetree as a
novel larval host for emerald ash borer. Journal
of Economic Entomology, 108(1): 370–375.
doi:10.1093/jee/tou026.
FOREST RESEARCH (2019). Chalara ash dieback
on different ash species and non-ash hosts.
Available online: www.forestresearch.gov.uk/news/
chalara-ash-dieback-different-ash-species-and-nonash-
hosts (accessed August 2019).
HILL, L., HEMERY, G., HECTOR, A. & BROWN,
N. (2018). Maintaining ecosystem properties
after loss of ash in Great Britain. Journal of
Applied Ecology, 56(2): 282–293. doi:https://doi.
org/10.1111/1365-2664.13255.
IPSN (2014). International Plant Sentinel Network,
The Network. Available online: www.plantsentinel.
org/the-network (accessed July 2019).
MANSFIELD, S., MCNEILL, M., AALDERS,
L.T., BELL, N.L., KEAN, J.M., BARRATT, B.I.P.,
BOYD-WILSON, K. & TEULSON, D.A.J. (2019). The
value of sentinel plants for risk assessment and
surveillance to support biosecurity. Neobiota, 48:
1–24. doi:10.3897/neobiota.48.34205.
MOUNCE, R., SMITH, P. & BROCKINGTON, S.
(2017). Ex situ conservation of plant diversity in the
world’s botanic gardens. Nature Plants, 3: 795–802.
ORLOVA-BIENKOWSKAJA, M.J., DROGVALENKO,
A.N., ZABULUEV, I.A., SAZHNEV, A.S.,
PEREGUDOVA, E.Y., MAZUROV, S.G., KOMAROV,
S.G. & BIEŃKOWSKI, A.O. (2019). Bad and
good news for ash trees in Europe: alien pest
Agrilus planipennis has spread to the Ukraine and
the south of European Russia, but does not kill
Fraxinus excelsior in the forests. bioRxiv, 689240.
doi:10.1101/689240.
Published
2020-02-21
How to Cite
Marfleet, K., & Sharrock, S. (2020). The International Plant Sentinel Network: an update on phase 2. Sibbaldia: The International Journal of Botanic Garden Horticulture, (18), 105-116. https://doi.org/10.23823/Sibbaldia/2020.291
Section
Articles