Phytophthora root rot: its impact in botanic gardens and on threatened species conservation

  • Brett Summerell Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust
  • Edward Liew Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust

Abstract

Phytophthora root rot is one of the most devastating diseases of perennial plants worldwide, affecting plants in food production, amenity plantings and in natural ecosystems. The impact of these diseases in botanic gardens can be substantial and can affect how a site may be used for months and years ahead. Management is critically dependent on avoidance of the introduction of the pathogen and effective hygiene protocols are key to achieving this. Additionally, botanic gardens have a key role to play in protecting plants and enhancing conservation outcomes through surveillance, education and ex situ conservation programmes, as well as through the recognition that they can be critical as sentinel sites to detect new incursions of pests and
diseases. The impact of several Phytophthora species on the in situ and ex situ management of the critically endangered Wollemia nobilis (Wollemi pine), which is highly susceptible to phytophthora root rot, is used to highlight the need to ensure management of these pathogens is a critical component of threatened species recovery and management.

Author Biographies

Brett Summerell, Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust

Brett Summerell is Director of Research and Chief Botanist

Edward Liew, Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust

Manager, Plant Pathology

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Published
2020-02-21
How to Cite
Summerell, B., & Liew, E. (2020). Phytophthora root rot: its impact in botanic gardens and on threatened species conservation. Sibbaldia: The International Journal of Botanic Garden Horticulture, (18), 89-104. https://doi.org/10.23823/Sibbaldia/2020.290
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Articles